How to get better sleep

Sleep is the arguably the most important part of the day, and it is also a huge struggle for so many people.  It has been shown that during sleep our bodies take time to repair damaged tissues and combat inflammation, as well as have a much needed break from digesting new food.  Without proper sleep, your body won’t have proper time to heal and repair.  People suffering with chronic pain, chronic fatigue, mood disorders, alzheimer’s, diabetes and other conditions would benefit greatly from this optimal time of healing.  It is also essential for athletes, whose activities could cause minor injuries or aches and pains.  It is in your best interest to do all that you can to control your sleep cycle.  Feeling rested with energy is such a fabulous way to start the day!

Here are some tips for how to get that snug-as-a-bug-in-a-rug, fulfilling sleep:

–   Go to bed and wake up at the same time every day.  This is optimal, and occasionally unattainable.  Do your best.

–   Sleep in a completely dark room (no cracks under the door, no glowing alarm clock, use light-blocking curtains)

–   Save the bedroom for sleeping and intimate activities only (no working or homework). On that note, do your best to make your room a sanctuary for sleep.  Make it clutter free, relaxing colors and sounds, comfortable temperature, etc.

–   No use of glowing electronics for 1 hour before bed (phone, tv, tablet, computer). The blue light stimulates your pineal gland, which tricks your body into thinking that it is not nighttime.

–   No eating within an hour of bedtime, and no caffeine after 12pm.  As stated above, sleep is  a time of digestive rest.  Unless you have a medical condition that requires otherwise, try to go to bed with a slight sensation of hunger (*weight loss tip!).

–   Avoid the excessive alcohol intake, especially before bedtime.  Alcohol raises your cortisol, which will keep you up at night.  If you do fall asleep, it will be less restful than if you didn’t have alcohol in your system.

–   Exercise or get some vigorous movement going within an hour of waking in the morning.  This gets your cortisol pumping, which is what should spike in the morning to get you out of bed.  By having a regular morning workout routine, you will encourage the cortisol burst to occur on its own before you even get up.  (*also a weight loss tip!)

–   If you cannot fall asleep after 30 minutes, get out of bed and read or do something relaxing for 30 minutes (don’t turn on the TV or computer!). Then try again.

If these tips do not help set your circadian rhythm within a few weeks, you may need a little help from our botanical, nutritional or pharmaceutical friends.  Commonly recommended supplements include melatonin, phosphatidyserine, chamomile, valerian, passionflower, kava kava, and hops.  These are all great and have their roles, but chronic use of some of these could have side effects.  Please consult a physician if you need help with choosing a sleep aid and the proper dosages.  Also, if you have an opposite sleep schedule (working nights and sleeping days), you are also a special situation and should seek a physician’s advice.  Did you know that working a swing/graveyard shift puts you at greater risk of many diseases?  It’s best to only work these hours for a limited time if possible.

Please contact me with any questions or comments. Happy sleeping!

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